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21.2.13

The Beginning {Flashback Friday}

As I have now gone past my breastfeeding goal with Harry and get ever closer to my last ever breastfeed (sad face) I keep looking back on my feeding experiences with him and Charles.
Charles was diagnosed with tongue tie at three days old. We have a wonderful breastfeeding team here and they came out late on the Tuesday night to see me as I was in tears and was bleeding due to his latch. The counsellor who visited me that night said she would get someone to come round first thing the following morning to check again as she suspected it may be tongue tie but wasn't completely sure.
I hadn't really heard of tongue tie before so didn't really know what would happen.
The next day, as promised, my saviour arrived, diagnosed the tongue tie immediately and made a phone call for it to be snipped at a hospital in Norwich.
The only problem was that usually we would have been able to have been seen the next day, as clinic is open on a Monday and a Thursday, except the consultant was away so we couldn't get in until the following Monday. That meant 8 days of feeding a baby with quite a severe tongue tie.
I was dreading every feed. The pain was excruciating, it made my toes curl and I felt like an awful mummy because I would hesitate a lot at every feed. Charles would be ready to latch on, desperate for milk and I would pull away, take him off, or try and hold off for a while.
Even now it makes me cry. It was an awful awful, painful week. With this along with normal post birth tiredness and a family member starting to bully me
And although once the tie was cut he was able to feed perfectly, I still hesitated and it took me two weeks to finally be able to feed him confidently and comfortably.

The breastfeeding counsellor who diagnosed the tongue tie was amazing. She visited me everyday, and phoned at the weekend. Even now it makes me get a bit choked up because her support was amazing.
As she came for the last visit, with Charles at least, I handed her a thank you card and some chocolate and she handed me a card.
The card was laughed at by some but for me it was, and still is, a reminder of how tough things were in that first week and that despite people's thoughts that I am "the breastfeeding nazi" etc, I had it tough too and went through pain that I felt was worse than my labour.
This Breastfeeding Counsellor helped me two years later with Harry. Helping me in the first three weeks when Harry gained the nickname "Harry Larry Lazy Latch". She also helped when I was diagnosed with Mastitis in May 2012.
As she turned up to my door just after I had Harry she said that she was glad she saw my name on the list and asked specifically to come and see me. The reason? She had found out, since visiting me two years previous, that we are [distantly] related. Although there is a gap between our ages (she has children my age and older than me, in fact I know her children) our Grandads were brothers!
We're still in touch via Facebook now, although she is no longer working for the Breastfeeding Team. But her help made me realise that women need encouragement to carry on. Just having her support got me through those 8 days of horrendous pain.
I really hope I can eventually do the same for someone else.

Remember a flashback can be from any time whether it be yesterday, last week, last month, last year or yesteryear! It can be a flashback of your own, your children, your partner or your friends. And if you don't want to write a post, then just link up a photo with a date. If you don't have time to write a new post, no problem simply link up a post you have already posted.
There is no theme this week, or next week.