7.8.18

Pendragon Castle, Cumbria

On the way back from Scotland we stopped off in Cumbria for the night to break down the journey. We found a really lovely campsite, in fact I think we both wished we'd been able to stay longer at that campsite and exploring that area too.

On the Saturday we drove back to Suffolk through the winding roads of the Yorkshire Dales. OH it was absolutely stunning, it was just a shame we were short on time as there were so many places we would have loved to have stopped.

We both have a love of churches and castles. I particularly like castle ruins rather than castles that have been restored. If they are restored I like to be able to see enough of the ruins really rather than it being more like a recreation.
Anyway, driving a long we noticed Pendragon Castle. We pulled up on the verge opposite and walked over.

Now privately owned, the castle was rumoured to have been built by Uther Pendragon, father of King Arthur. According to legend, Uther Pendragon and a his men were killed here when the Saxon invaders poisoned the well, however, there is no real evidence (other than legend and the discovery of a Roman coin) that there was any building here before the Normans built their castle in the 12th Century.

The castle was attacked by Scots raiding parties in 1342 and again in 1541. After the latter attack it remained an uninhabitable ruin until it passed into the hands of Lady Anne Clifford, who rebuilt it in 1660, also adding a brew house, bake house, stables and coach house. It remained one of the favourites among her many castles until her death in 1676 at the age of 86 years.
Lady Anne's successor, the Earl of Thanet, had no use for the castle and removed anything of value from it, including the lead from the roof. By the 1770s much of the building above the second storey had collapsed, and it has since gradually decayed further to become the ruin seen today.

It was small but beautiful. I think it would have been nice to have some kind of indication of what we were looking at with certain sections of the ruins but it was a pleasure to visit without that.
The sheep grazing on the land were an added bonus, as well as the absolutely stunning landscape surrounding the castle.

pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
pendragon castle
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